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Full Version: Wentworth Miller Reveals He Was Diagnosed With Autism: ‘Being Autistic Is Central to
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The COVID-19 pandemic gave a lot of us time and space to get to know ourselves a little better. And for Prison Break actor Wentworth Miller, being in quarantine led to an autism diagnosis. Miller, who revealed his diagnosis on Instagram this week, said it was “a shock, but not a surprise.”

Miller wrote, “Like everyone, life in quarantine took things from me. But in the quiet/isolation, I found unexpected gifts.” As of this fall, it will be one year “since I received my informal autism diagnosis. Preceded by a self-diagnosis. Followed by a formal diagnosis,” he said.

“It was a long, flawed process in need of updating. IMO. I'm a middle-aged man. Not a 5-year-old,” he said. But, at the same time, Miller recognized that having “access to a diagnosis is a privilege many do not enjoy.”

The symptoms of autism spectrum disorder typically appear in early childhood, the Mayo Clinic says, and can include issues with social interaction, such as a child not responding to their name, having trouble keeping a conversation going, or not holding eye contact. But that doesn't mean that people can't be diagnosed later in life.

Diagnosing autism spectrum disorder in adults can be challenging, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). That's partly because the way autism symptoms manifest in adults may overlap with symptoms of mental health issues, such as anxiety or ADHD. The diagnostic process typically involves the help of a specialist, like a neuropsychologist or a psychiatrist, who will ask about challenges in social interactions and any repetitive behaviors, sensory issues, or limited interests, the NIMH says. A person's developmental history may provide useful information here as well.

Although Miller knows that revealing his diagnosis publicly will put him in a position to speak to a wide audience about autism, he says he's still learning about all the nuances of the topic, including turning to people in the autistic and neurodivergent communities on social media. “Right now my work looks like evolving my understanding. Re-examining five decades of lived experience thru a new lens. That will take time,” he says. “Meanwhile, I don't want to run the risk of suddenly being a loud, ill-informed voice in the room.”

Miller also made a point to thank those who've given him “that extra bit of grace and space over the years” and allowed him to “move through the world in a way that made sense” to him, whether or not it made sense to them. Ultimately, Miller says that being autistic is not something he's trying to change about himself. On the contrary, he “got immediately” that it's “central to who I am. To everything I've achieved/articulated.”


https://www.self.com/story/wentworth-mil...-diagnosis
from instagram:

Like everyone, life in quarantine took things from me.

But in the quiet/isolation, I found unexpected gifts.

This fall marks 1 year since I received my informal autism diagnosis. Preceded by a self-diagnosis. Followed by a formal diagnosis.

It was a long, flawed process in need of updating. IMO. I'm a middle-aged man. Not a 5-year-old.

And (it's a "both/and") I recognize access to a diagnosis is a privilege many do not enjoy.

Let's just say it was a shock. But not a surprise.

There is a now-familiar cultural narrative (in which I've participated) that goes, "Public figure shares A, B and C publicly, dedicates platform to D, E and F."

Good for them. /srs

And (it's a "both/and") that's not necessarily what's going to happen here. I don't know enough about autism. (There's a lot to know.) Right now my work looks like evolving my understanding. Re-examining 5 decades of lived experience thru a new lens.

That will take time.

Meanwhile, I don't want to run the risk of suddenly being a loud, ill-informed voice in the room. The #autistic community (this I do know) has historically been talked over. Spoken for. I don't wish to do additional harm. Only to raise my hand, say, "I am here. Have been (w/o realizing it)."

If anyone's interested in delving deeper into #autism + #neurodiversity, I'll point you toward the numerous individuals sharing thoughtful + inspiring content on Instagram, TikTok... Unpacking terminology. Adding nuance. Fighting stigma.

These creators (some quite young) speak to the relevant issues more knowledgeably/fluently than I can. (They've been schooling me as well.)

That's the extent of what I'm inclined to share atm.

Oh - this isn't something I'd change. No. I get - got - immediately being autistic is central to who I am. To everything I've achieved/articulated.

Oh - I also want to say to the many (many) people who consciously or unconsciously gave me that extra bit of grace + space over the years, allowed me to move thru the world in a way that made sense to me whether or not it made sense to them... thank you.

And to those who made a different choice... well. People will reveal themselves.

Another gift.

W.M.
2w
Another one like us? Whoa....
came out as gay in the last couple of years

wish they would use him on tv more
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