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Developmental delay seems to be a big business
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MM Offline
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Post: #1
Developmental delay seems to be a big business
I had a job interview for nanny job. One kid has developmental delay and has to get OT therapy. The kid seems really clever to me but has vision problems. They told me that he does not have autism. Of course I am cheaper than any therapy trained person. They also told me to ignore the older daughter totally except give her food.

OT of kids must be a big business. I was reading one website on the developmental delays and I had some of them when I was 5/6 yrs old like can't tie shoe, not so good at sports or can't tell left from right. Also poor social and play skills amd some other stuff. I really can't believe the $$$ rich people will spend to get their kids to seem "normal".
05-14-2018 08:43 PM
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142857 Offline
Who's your Daddy?
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Post: #2
RE: Developmental delay seems to be a big business
In a lot of cases kids with developmental delays will catch up of their own accord. Of course the overpriced therapists will claim that any and all improvements are purely a result of the expensive therapy.
05-15-2018 07:59 AM
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Genesis Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Developmental delay seems to be a big business
I couldn't tie my shoes until I was 13, I still have to remember which way is right and/or left when I'm spotting at work.... yet that's basically it (for now)

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05-15-2018 02:14 PM
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Ffydwyrr Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Developmental delay seems to be a big business
I still struggle with tying my shoes. But when I was a kid, I created a "system" where I can just tie them occasionally, and use my fingers to guide my feet in and out of my already-tied shoes most of the time. Saves time and hassle! Besides, laceless/slip-on shoes are becoming more common and popular these days, and not just for disabled people, but for athletes as well. I predict that in the future, tying shoes will become a less needed skill, like cursive writing, touch-typing, or driving a stick-shift car. Or, for that matter, using proper spelling and grammar. u no wat i meen?

Being good at sports is an overrated skill if you ask me. A very small percentage of the general population will grow up to play sports professionally, and yet so many schools and higher learning institutions play up sports like they're all that matters in life, and physically limited/uncoordinated youth barely deserve to be called human.

As for "can't tell left from right", well, "left" and "right" can mean a lot of things depending on the context. Does the person talking mean their left/right, or yours? And another example. Say you're driving, and you have to put your car in reverse. Turning your steering wheel left or right will make them do the opposite of what they usually do. I've been driving since I was a teenager and I still have problems with this. Backing into, or out of, parking spaces is surprisingly tough.

Poor social skills? If you think about it, everyone has poor social skills in one respect or another, and yet nobody complains unless the people in question have some sort of mental/psychological disability. It's a double standard. If everyone had these fabled "good social skills", there'd be no arguments, no divorce, no lawsuits, no broken friendships, no political divisions, no war, no conflict of any kind. We'd all be able to read one another's minds, more or less.

And as for "poor play skills", I find it more than a little presumptuous to judge every child by the same rigid and narrow play skills rubric. Children make sense of the unfamiliar, often-confusing world around them in different ways. That's what makes us all human. As long as your kid's not doing anything harmful, don't judge, and don't interfere.

The problem with so many parents and developmental/behavioral psychology experts today is that they refuse to allow children to be average or imperfect. Kids are either geniuses and prodigies, or seriously deficient and in need of professional attention. There is no middle ground anymore. Hence the rise of behavioral/learning/attention disorders in recent decades. Hence the burgeoning industry built around therapy and medicating imperfect, struggling, criminally average and sub-normal children in desperate need of correction. Excellence isn't just encouraged; it's enforced.

Look at the underlying causes of this trend. There's only one proper way to learn, one small set of core skills to acquire (often revolving around memorizing information that's easily accessible on the Web), and several hours of sitting quietly every day. And standardized test after standardized test! It would be a severe breach of conduct for a child to make too many requests or suggestions to make their school settings more appropriate. Yet that's what so many adults do all the time at their workplace meetings. What's a child to do?

(Also, consider this: Most civilized societies wouldn't require adults to engage in organized sports endeavors based on their ages and genders.)

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05-15-2018 03:34 PM
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MM Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Developmental delay seems to be a big business
I have to agree with much of the previous posts.

I find segregating children by age groups into boxes for all day auditory learning is just unnatural. Plus not everyone has the same learning style. I am a more visual learner. After trying to listen for a few minutes the droning voice turns into Charlie Brown's teacher "wah wah wah wah."

For thousands of years children were at their parents side and learned by doing and watching. They listened to tales by the fire light. They observed nature. Most of their daily tasks were repetitive and followed the daily, weekly seasonal routine.

Kids now are constantly plugged into watching video in car, using tablets and phones to play games during meals and during play time when they could be doing physical or imaginative play.

I have been interviewing for a nanny job that is some cleaning, some cooking and taking care of this 6 yr old boy who has some developmental delays. They want me to do his OT practice with him because they are "too busy" as both parents work and get home too late. The kid has really thick glasses and a lactose intolerance. I think having vision that may not have been corrected too early and constant pain caused much of his delays. They told me he does not have autism. I haven't been officially hired but I am interested.
05-15-2018 09:22 PM
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Ffydwyrr Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Developmental delay seems to be a big business
Pain/discomfort plays a huge role in whether skills are acquired on time. It should be obvious to everyone involved. Anyway, I hope you get the job, because you seem to have the boy's best interests at heart.

Also, visual learners of the world unite! I must have learned more from children's encyclopedias and field guides than I did from my actual classwork in my first five or six years of schooling. In my opinion, we as a society need to bring back the lost arts of independent study and apprenticeship. We'd all be better off for it.

For an overview of myself, see my introductory post here: http://www.autismfriendsnetwork.biz/show...p?tid=3542
To listen to my original music, visit http://soundcloud.com/lwbuilder/
Also, if you have trouble spelling or pronouncing my name, just call me Mr. F.
05-16-2018 04:30 AM
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MM Offline
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Post: #7
RE: Developmental delay seems to be a big business
My present job is mostly stress free even though for some time I just sit around. I clean, cook meals for the kids, do laundry and care for the dogs. If everything is done and so that I have 30 min to an hour to relax before cooking the dinner fine. I am not going to exhaust myself celaning out the closets or washing windows. Sometimes I do that.

The problem is some employers are just bad employers. They expect too much and have worst tantrums than their kids. Or they can turn around after a few weeks and say they don't think it is working out and fire you. I need to make money.

So what is happening is I have to talk to present employers and find out if she is going to keep me on. Then the prospective employer wants to make a contract probably trying to get the most work out of me for the least money. I also do not want to get beat up by some kid.

I expect this kid might carch up but he goes to a special school which sometimes not so great. If he is never expcted to sit in a regualr classroom then he might never get out. That might totally limit a kid's future.
(This post was last modified: 05-18-2018 01:45 AM by MM.)
05-18-2018 01:45 AM
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