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Multisystem inflammatory syndrome
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skyblue1 Offline
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Multisystem inflammatory syndrome
Multisystem inflammatory syndromeis is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs. We do not yet know what causes MIS-C. However, we know that many children with MIS-C had the virus that causes COVID-19, or had been around someone with COVID-19. MIS-C can be serious, even deadly, but most children who were diagnosed with this condition have gotten better with medical care.

CDC is still learning about MIS-C and how it affects children, so we don’t know why some children have gotten sick with MIS-C and others have not. We also do not know if children with certain health conditions are more likely to get MIS-C. These are among the many questions CDC is working to try to understand.

All CDC recommendations are based on the best data and science available at the time, and we will update them as we learn more.


more;
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nco...ildren/mis

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08-08-2020 10:48 PM
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skyblue1 Offline
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RE: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome
As of August 6, MIS-C, a multi-system inflammatory syndrome, was identified in at least 570 kids across the country, ranging in age from less than 1 to 20. About two-thirds of those children didn't have underlying conditions before being diagnosed with MIS-C, like Juliet Daly, a Louisiana 12-year-old who nearly died in April.

It is true that children are far less likely to get sick from Covid-19, as compared to adults, but they are by no means immune. They can become infected and they can spread it quickly. A widely cited study out of South Korea showed that kids 10 to 19 were spreading the virus just as much as adults. In fact, they had the highest rate of Covid-19 among household contacts. Interestingly, in that same study, children younger than 10 did not account for a significant amount of viral spread. This was surprising because a recent study published in JAMA Pediatrics concluded younger kids may carry higher amounts of the virus in their nose, as compared to adults. And any parent will tell you how easilylittle kids spread viruses in their own homes. (When our kids were very young, a single cold in any one of them meant the whole family was going to soon become infected.)

So, I decided to take a closer look at the South Korean study, and noticed a very important detail: It included fewer than 30 positive cases younger than 10 years old. Of the nearly 60,000 contacts that were traced in that study, only 237 were from children under 10. The low rate of spread among young kids may not have been because they are less likely to transmit the virus, but because they have largely been home over the last few months, and had few contacts as a result

As our kids become increasingly mobile, they will become part of a large national experiment, and there is little doubt the infection rates will increase. Just over the past four weeks, the number of children infected in the United States has increased by 90% to more than 380,000 cases, according to that same analysis by AAP and CHA. While some of that increase may be due to increased testing, younger kids starting to emerge from their homes for the first time also play a role. And, for much of the country, schools haven't even yet reopened.

It is also important to remember that a school community is made up of more than just young students. According to one recent analysis, nearly a quarter of teachers working in the United States school system are at higher risk of serious illness from Covid-19, either because of age or pre-existing conditions. I was particularly struck by the stories of worried teachers around the country who said they were writing out their wills in anticipation of returning to school.


https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/12/health/co...index.html

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08-13-2020 02:52 AM
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142857 Offline
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RE: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome
We still have a lot to learn about COVID-19, and we know almost nothing about long term effects.
08-13-2020 07:29 PM
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skyblue1 Offline
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RE: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome
long term effects can be severe

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08-14-2020 06:10 AM
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